News in Food Safety

Chipotle says it will hike the cost of burritos if Trump slaps tariffs on Mexico

US Food Safety - June 3, 2019 - 12:55pm

by Jeanette Settembre

Chipotle (CMG)  could raise prices for its burritos if President Donald Trump follows through with his threat to impose tariffs on products from Mexico next week.

Trump said last week he would implement a 5% tariff on all goods and imports from Mexico beginning June 10 unless “the illegal migration crisis is alleviated.” The proposed tariffs, which could raise the prices consumers pay for imports including tequila, beer and avocados, could increase to 25% in the coming months.

“If the tariffs become permanent, we would look to offset these costs through other margin improvement efforts already underway,” Chipotle chief financial officer Jack Hartung said Monday. “We could also consider passing on these costs through a modest price increase, such as about a nickel on a burrito, which would cover the increased cost without impacting our strong value proposition.”

That 5-cent increase would mean prices for Chipotle’s chicken, veggie or sofritas-filled burritos would go up to $9 (from $8.95); steak, barbacoa or carnitas filled burritos would cost $10 (up from $9.95).

The California-based fast-casual Mexican food chain said its company costs would soar $15 million this year if the tariffs go into effect, Hartung said in a statement.

More than three-quarters of avocados in the U.S. were imported from Mexico last year, according to the Hass Avocado Board.

Prices for the trendy green fruit used for avocado toast and guacamole on brunch menus across the country rose in April when Trump threatened to close the Mexican border. Avocado prices soared to more than double the average cost after Trump’s announcement, chefs told MarketWatch, the biggest bump in a decade. Some restaurateurs were forking over $90 a case versus around $38 before the threat.

As of this week, one New York chef told MarketWatch he was still paying $82 a case.

Chipotle blamed the rising cost of fresh avocados for the possible menu price hikes. The restaurant chain says it refuses to use cheaper options like pre-mashed, or processed avocados.

Consumers can expect to see prices on other Mexican imports rise more than 20% in the coming months, Phil Lempert, founder of Supermarketguru.com, a trade publication that tracks food news and trends, told MarketWatch.

“Many of their [Mexican] exports enjoy high margins –– beer, tequila and produce, in particular –– so they don’t have to rely on the U.S. as their only export partner. The U.S. consumer is the big loser,” Lempert added.

Shares of Chipotle have been up 48.7% this year compared to 6% increase for the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA)  and a 9% gain for the S&P 500 (SPX).

source: http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/companies/chipotle-says-it-will-hike-the-cost-of-burritos-if-trump-slaps-tariffs-on-mexico/ar-AACknX7?ocid=ientp

© 2019 US Food Safety Corporation. No copyright claim is made for portions of this blog and linked items that are works of the United States Government, state governments or third parties.

Categories: News in Food Safety

Mediterranean Diet Roundtable in Washington, D.C.

US Food Safety - June 3, 2019 - 10:10am

 

Sponsored Advertorial

Join the Mediterranean Diet Roundtable (MDR)  Thursday, June 27, 2019

Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center

1300 Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest

Washington, DC 20004

The Mediterranean Diet Roundtable is an inspirational and experiential conference, where scientists and Food Industry leaders discuss dietary trends in America. An elite gathering, the MDR so far has attracted hundreds of professionals from all over the U.S. and the Mediterranean Countries. A team of outstanding professionals will lead a two half-day programs organized in panels about scientific findings, nutrition and social impact, menu’s engineering, exemplary stores and cafeteria strategies, and regulatory matters about Food and Beverages. Gain a deep understanding of the health values, commercial benefits & market trends in our dynamic, informative and interactive event! Don’t miss out the upcoming Mediterranean Diet Roundtable!

The MDR is an exclusive signature program by Accent PR.

EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT!

Register by May 13 and receive a $100 discount!
Use code MDR-EB2019 (case sensitive) on the blue link at checkout. JOIN THE MDR AMBASSADORS’ BREAKFAST PROGRAM FOR JUNE 27
(subject to change) Audience: scientists, doctors, dietitians, nutritionists, importers, manufacturers, distributors, directors of different food service programs, procurement directors, etc.

• 8:30 registration

• 9:00 am introductions and welcoming remarks.

• 9:15 am – 10:15 am: “Nutrition Education in Primary Schools: an international perspective and Innovative Approaches.” Francesca Scazzina, Università di Parma (Italy). Antoni Caimari Palou, Eurecat, Centre Tecnològic de Catalunya (Spain). Early education in nutrition is a crucial steep to fight childhood obesity and dependency. A seed for lifetime wellness and health.

• 10:15 am – 10:45 am: Global challenges for adaptation of plant based diets. Prof. Eric Decker Professor and Head of the Department of Food Science at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst

• 10:45 to 11 coffee break

• 11:00 to 12:15 In Sickness and in Health: Mediterranean Diet Applications across the Continuum of Care
This panel of experts, moderated by experienced nutrition and healthcare executive, Mary Angela Miller, MS, RDN, LD, will discuss implementation and implications at each stage of the healthcare cycle.
Care Experts: Community Care: Michael Folino, RDN, LD, Associate Director, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH.
Acute Care: Angelo Mojica, Ph.D., RD, CEC, Senior Director of Nutrition and Culinary Services, Johns Hopkins Health Services, Baltimore, MD.
Chronic Care: Amanda Goldman, Director, Diabetes & Nutrition Care, KentuckyOne Health, Lexington, KY.
Extended Care: Suzanne Cryst, RDN, CSG, LD, Nutrition Services Director, Hickory Ridge Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, Akron OH

• 12:30 – 2:00 pm Experiential lunch with educational tasting about Mediterranean Flavors.

• 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm COUNTRY PRESENTATION: CYPRUS, the gem of the Mediterranean Sea

• 2:30 pm – 3:00 pm Menus of Change: Reframing and Advancing the Mediterranean Diet. Greg Drescher, VP Culinary Institute of America

• 3:00 – 3:30 pm Challenges to Progress in School Food: Farmers, Manufacturers, and Food Policy Fundamentals. Prof. Parke Wilde, Ph.D. (Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University).

• 3:30 – 4:30 pm Challenges to Progress in School Food: Key Stakeholders on the Long Road to Implementing the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act. A panel discussion about how science and consensus-based school food regulations, which had previously enjoyed bipartisan support, became politicized to the point of reversal, reopening a debate health advocates believed to be settled. Moderated by Prof. Parke Wilde. With Colin Schwartz, Deputy Director, Legislative Affairs, or Margo Wootan, Vice President for Nutrition, Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI); Fania Yangarber, Executive Director, Healthy School Food Maryland; Elizabeth Marchetta, Executive Director, Food and Nutrition Department, Baltimore City Public Schools

At the end: Roundtable discussion with the audience and all the speakers.

DON’T MISS IT.

 

 

Sponsorship opportunities are available for this wonderful, international event. Tickets to participate and additional information can be found at www.mdrproject.com.

© 2019 US Food Safety Corporation. No copyright claim is made for portions of this blog and linked items that are works of the United States Government, state governments or third parties.

Categories: News in Food Safety

FDA Wants Food Expiration Dates Standardized With 'Best if Used By' to Cut Waste

Quality Assurance Mag - June 3, 2019 - 7:04am

The Food and Drug Administration announced on May 23 that it strongly supports the food industry’s efforts to standardize date labeling. Research has shown that "best if used by" – not, say not “best by” or “sell by” – helps shoppers better understand they don’t need to throw foods out after the printed date passes if they’re stored correctly. 

In a press release, FDA said consumer uncertainty about the meaning of the dates that appear on the labels of packaged foods is believed to contribute to about 20 percent of food waste in the home. 

That’s not surprising when you consider the variety of terms used with date labels, such as “use before,” “sell by,” “expires on,” and many more.

To help dispel this confusion, the FDA is supporting the food industry’s efforts to standardize the use of the term “Best if Used By” on its packaged-food labeling if the date is simply related to optimal quality — not safety. Studies have shown that this best conveys to consumers that these products do not have to be discarded after the date if they are stored properly. “We expect that over time, the number of various date labels will be reduced as industry aligns on this ‘Best if Used By’ terminology,” says Yiannas. “This change is already being adopted by many food producers.”

The FDA’s efforts are part of a White House initiative called Winning on Reducing Food Waste. And part of this collaboration between the FDA, the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Agriculture involves educating consumers on ways to reduce food loss and waste, and how to do it safely without risking illness from consuming spoiled food.

Click here to read the entire press release.

Source: FDA


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Categories: News in Food Safety

Smoky Bar Harbor® Fish Tacos Recipe

US Food Safety - June 3, 2019 - 6:30am

Sponsored Recipe

Smoky Bar Harbor® Fish Tacos

A great recipe for the ever popular fish tacos made the New England way. A huge reduction in cost, pared with the smoky flavor only found in Bar Harbor® Skinless, Boneless Smoked Sardines makes this phenomenal taco twist into a fast and glorious repast.

Creamy Cucumber Cilantro Sauce (recipe below)

1 (6.7-ounce) can Bar Harbor® Skinless, Boneless Smoked Sardine Fillets

Three 6-inch flour tortilla shells

1 cup shredded lettuce

1/4 cup shreedded Cheddar cheese

A few slices onion

Make Creamy Cucumber Cilantro Sauce, letting it sit in refrigerator for at least an hour before using.

Gently transfer sardines to skillet and heat over low until warmed throughout; set aside. Open all three tortilla shells on a large plate and mound lettuce down the center of each. Evenly divide the sardines on top of lettuce, followed by Creamy Cucumber Cilantro Sauce, cheese and onion. Fold up and have at it!

Creamy Cucumber Cilantro Sauce: mix 1/4 cup each sour cream and mayonnaise, 2 tablespoons minced cucumber, 1 teaspoon lime juice, 1 teaspoon dried coriander, large pinches of garlic powder, cumin, salt and black pepper as desired, Blend well and refrigerate.

 

 

© 2019 US Food Safety Corporation. No copyright claim is made for portions of this blog and linked items that are works of the United States Government, state governments or third parties.

Categories: News in Food Safety

Discounted registration available for IAFP 2019 in Louisville this July

Food Safety news - June 2, 2019 - 9:05pm

Registration is open for the 2019 conference of the International Association for Food Protection, set for July 21-24 at the Kentucky International Convention Center in Louisville. Attendees who register early receive a discount, which is available through June 20. View fee details here.

Professor Barbara Chamberlin of New Mexico State University will open the conference with the Ivan Parkin Lecture on Sunday evening. Are presentation is entitled “The Power of Play: Using Media to Educate Our Stakeholders.” Monday’s agenda includes FDA Deputy Commissioner for Food Policy and Response Frank Yiannas and USDA Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety U.S. Department of Agriculture Mindy Brashears.

On Wednesday, CDC’s Robert V. Tauxe, the director of the division of foodborne, waterborne and environmental diseases will close the conference sessions with the John H. Silliker Lecture, which he has titled “From Outbreak Catastrophes to Clades of Concern, How Whole Genome Sequencing Can Change the Food Safety Landscape.”

For those interested in exhibitor space, the Exhibitor Registration Form can be found here, with additional information including the current exhibitor list and floor plan. Booth information such as selection and cancellation deadlines, as well as sponsorship and program book listing deadlines can be viewed here.

With a reputation for quality content, the IAFP Annual Meeting features more than 1,000 technical, poster and symposia presentations detailing current information on a variety of topics relating to food safety. Among the workshops, receptions, poster sessions, lectures, luncheons, technical and educational sessions, IAFP features special Student Activities. Additionally, attendees can also view a list of Committee & PDG Meetings.

The IAFP provides food safety professionals around the world with a forum to exchange information on protecting the food supply. Each year, the IAFP hosts the conference to provide information on current and emerging food safety issues, the latest science, innovative solutions to new and recurring problems, and the opportunity to network with thousands of food safety professionals from around the globe.

The event has grown to become the leading food safety conference worldwide, with attendance of more than 3,600 people from the industry, academia, and government from six continents. Exhibits include the latest in available technologies and leading experts will present information about a variety of topics.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

Categories: News in Food Safety

IFST event to discuss food safety culture

Food Safety news - June 2, 2019 - 9:03pm

IFST’s Food Safety Group is hosting an event ahead of World Food Safety Day to highlight the importance of a food safety culture.

The event on June 6 will feature presentations from Sterling Crew, chair of IFST Food Safety Group and managing director at SQS Ltd, and Denis Treacy, chief technical officer at Culture Compass Ltd, who between them have more than 60 years’ worth of experience in the food supply chain.

The pair will review current best practice and share their experience on the challenges of delivering a positive food safety culture. The test for businesses is to get a food safety culture into their operations so a good practice is second nature and embraced from the boardroom to the shop floor.

The Institute of Food Science & Technology (IFST) is a U.K. group for people involved in food science and technology.

Denis Treacy

Treacy told Food Safety News that the behavioral culture of an organization falls into four key categories.

“These are reactive, supervised, independent and interdependent, each representing a different maturity level and set of capabilities and competencies of both the management team and the operators,” he said.

“Food safety can be written into the policies, procedures, and duties of an organization and be part of processes, but success depends upon the maturity of the culture, which in-turn is depended upon the behaviors of the leadership team and the competence of the workforce to apply the policies and procedures.”

Food safety, or any behavior dependent deliverable, can be measured by failures such as complaints, non-conformances or incidents of contamination, said Treacy.

“Targets will normally be set to reduce such instances, and this will – if driven hard – have a measure of success. Without cultural maturity, it may also drive the re-evaluation of these failure measures, so improvements are seen by re-defining or even removing numbers by means other than the improvement of standards,” he said.

“To drive a cultural change, you have to measure positives and negative indicators, but only target the positives, so they perpetuate a positive and inquisitive culture, not driven by failure and blame. Positive measure example is the identification and removal of unsafe conditions that could give rise – if unattended – to a failure.”

Measuring and keeping a food safety culture

Treacy said it will be “difficult” to stop food safety culture becoming a buzzword that everyone says but not all do.

“Particularly as we include what the world believes cultural measures to be in certifications such as BRC version 8. The success of any behaviorally dependent deliverable is to ensure it is embedded in the uncompromising values of the business and is non-negotiable.”

Food safety culture has been included in the BRC Global Standard for Food Safety Issue 8.

One challenge is preventing any decline in standards once companies do have a food safety culture, like what can happen once certification is achieved.

“Unfortunately this will be the case, unless businesses are mindful that certification could serve to provide a completely false sense of security, particularly where quality assurance and food safety teams in businesses are now so focused on accreditation standards and success in audits, they have actually lost the ability to evaluate risk for themselves,” said Treacy.

The session will review the current best practice and look to the future as well as including a workshop to be interactive.

The first-ever World Food Safety Day (WFSD) will be marked on June 7, 2019, under the theme “Food Safety, everyone’s business”.

Crew said the behavior is an important part of creating a positive food safety culture.

“I believe that only by understanding and changing a food handler’s behavior, will we be able to embed food safety into an organization’s culture and drive improvement. It will be great to get a view of food safety culture from the group.”

The event costs £10 for IFST members and £46 (including one year of IFST membership) for non-members. To book a place in London click this link

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

Categories: News in Food Safety

Air France warning after Listeria detected in sandwich

Food Safety news - June 2, 2019 - 9:03pm

Air France has issued a warning after Listeria was detected in tuna sandwiches served on certain flights in May. Servair, the supplier of the airline’s on-board catering service, reported the pathogen was found in the sandwiches from self-service on-board buffets.

It was revealed during quality check procedures on foodstuffs distributed aboard Air France flights.

The sandwich was available in the economy and premium economy cabins of nine long-haul flights departing Paris Orly and Paris Charles de Gaulle between May 21 and 24.

Servair withdrew all products, provided by Air Food, from the services on board Air France flights.

Air France and Servair have as yet not been informed of any cases of illness. Servair, a Gategroup subsidiary, is active at 31 airports in 19 countries and has 10,500 employees.

Air France apologized to those affected in a statement and said its customer services teams can offer information and support.

“Air France reminds that food safety is a priority and is subject to strict and daily controls, certified by the ISO 22000 standard,” said the company.

“As a precautionary measure and only if they develop a fever, whether isolated or accompanied by a headache, Air France recommends that any customers who were aboard the flights in question and who believe they ate that sandwich should inform their doctor of the situation.

“In particular, pregnant women, older people and those suffering from an immunodeficiency should look out for those symptoms, which could indicate listeriosis, a disease with an incubation period of up to eight weeks.”

Air France and Servair have made a helpline available to customers on the flights at 0800 091 091 from France (+33 1 44 18 06 92 from abroad); it is open 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Paris time.

List of flights:

  • May 21: AF662 from Paris-Charles de Gaulle to Dubai AF642 from Paris-Orly to La Réunion AF584 from Paris-Charles de Gaulle to Accra
  • May 22: AF878 from Paris-Charles de Gaulle to Ndjamena AF520 from Paris-Charles de Gaulle to Bamako AF642 from Paris-Orly to La Réunion
  • May 23: AF662 from Paris-Charles de Gaulle to Dubai
  • May 24: AF662 from Paris-Charles de Gaulle to Dubai AF818 from Paris-Charles de Gaulle to Abuja

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

Categories: News in Food Safety

Food stands are latest challenge for restaurant inspectors

Food Safety news - June 2, 2019 - 9:02pm

A mobile food truck and a “brokered” food stand, both in Bellevue, WA, remain closed after being shuttered last month by Public Health. The Seattle-King County agency reports its most recent restaurant closure was Tacos El Guero mobile food truck.

Public Health ordered Tacos El Guero to shut down shortly before noon Friday, May 31, because it was operating a mobile food truck without a valid permit and it has not submitted plans for review and approval.

The closure order is for vehicle license plant number C39468D. Tacos El Guero, based out of 3380 146th Place SW in Bellevue, has another food establishment by the same name that is operating legally, according to Public Health.

A brokered food stand operated by Lish Inc. at 929 108th Ave in Bellevue remains closed after being shut down on May 7 by Public Health.

When it was ordered to cease doing business, Lish Inc. was operating without a valid permit, without handwashing facilities, and without proper hot holding for potentially hazardous foods.

Lish Inc. is a licensed food establishment in Seattle. Its operation in Bellevue was reportedly a brokered food stand that partners with local restaurants to offer a limited menu at the food stand.

“The broker, in this case, was the Lish food establishment, which provided the infrastructure including stand and food-related equipment, point of sale technology, and smartphone app,” according to Public Health. “The partner restaurant prepares, transports, and serves food at the food stand that typically operates in office buildings anywhere from 1-5 days per week.”

Each day the stand offers customers in office buildings food options from a different restaurant, giving them, over a week’s time, a variety of food choices.

Public Health said the Lish-brokered food stand was ordered to close because of the specific violations it cited.

Seattle-King County Public Health is one of the largest metropolitan health departments in the United States, with a population of about 2.2 million people. It has a staff totaling about 1,400, operating out of 40 sites.

Public Health orders the immediate closure of restaurants for any one of several reasons, including:

  • High scores on a routine inspection.
  • No hot or running water.
  • No electricity.
  • Other imminent health hazards, including broken refrigeration, accident or natural disaster damages or when the establishment is linked to an outbreak of foodborne illness.
  • No operating permit or owner/manager interferes with the inspector’s ability to carry out their duties.

A 400 point inspection system is used by inspectors in King County. The violations are added up between red and blue violations. Restaurants are closed for chalking up more than 90 red points or more than 120 blue points.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

 

Categories: News in Food Safety

Letter from the Editor: Have Your Way With Jambalaya

Food Safety news - June 1, 2019 - 9:14pm
Opinion

Spent the last eight days of May on a “road trip.” Did read Food Safety News every day along with a local newspaper like the Lexington Herald-Leader.

This weekend finds me digging out and trying to catch up. Incoming email totals about 400 per day. But enough about my problems.

It was the first real “road trip” we’ve taken in years. A real road trip is one where you drive the backroads, staying off Interstates as much as possible. It can put you a little out of touch. You can even lose cell phone service.

So, I was out of touch on May 29 when the good news came down. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) last Wednesday announced it was no longer going to tell us how to make Jambalaya.

Having just come through the back roads of five southern and border states, I can attest to the fact that no one needs the government telling them how to make Jambalaya.  Not on Beale Street in 200-year old Memphis or any of the other places I’ve been these past few days.

Now how did this all come about you might ask?

Well, it seems that almost six years ago, the McCormick & Company owned Zatarain’s,  based in New Orleans, suggested in a formal petition that FSIS remove the requirement that Jambalaya contains 25 percent cooked ham and revise references in the “Food Standards and Labeling Policy Book for tomatoes and rice.

The petition specifically requested the following language to define Jambalaya:

“A Louisiana-style rice-based dish involving spices and seasoning, which may contain tomatoes. The product can contain meat, seafood, and/or vegetables such as sausage, chicken, ham, pork shrimp or bell peppers. It must all be comprised of at least 50 percent rice. Labeling must show true produce name, e.g.-Ham, and Shrimp Jambalaya.”

After thinking about for the past six years, however, FSIS decided that instead of revising the entry from the Policy Book, it would remove it entirely. In the future, products labeled as Jambalaya will just have to disclose its level of meats and poultry.

The Zatarain definition is correct in that Jambalaya likely did originate in Louisiana, but spread throughout the South and beyond in recent years.

“Just as there is no set standard list of ingredients that must be included in Jambalaya, even the dish’s origins are open to speculation, wrote San Francisco food writer and chef, Eric Burkett, in Food Safety News almost a decade ago. “Some cookbooks–many, actually–suggest it has French roots. The French word for ham is jambon which sounds like… well, you get it. Perhaps a more likely source is that classic Spanish dish, paella, which its rich assortment of surf and turf mixed with fragrant saffron rice. The Spanish ruled Louisiana for nearly 40 years, and Spanish influence over the region was much longer.”

As good-to-great Jambalaya can be, it always involves a word of caution. There’s no room for error when dealing with shellfish and other ingredients. Two years ago Jambalaya served as a fundraising event for Louisiana parish softball league, sicked 160 people and resulted in one death. Salmonella and Clostridium perfringens, a bacterium commonly found on raw meat and poultry, were the pathogens doing the damage because the Jambalaya was not prepared and held at correct temperatures.

So, just because FSIS is no longer telling us what has to go into Jambalaya, don’t forget the usual precautions and make sure you can trust the restaurant.

One piece of news from the road that was kind of fascinating. It seems eastern Kentucky has visions of becoming the “high tech agriculture” capital of the country and some big money is involved.

Here’s the vision. Why since about one-half of the U.S. population is within one day’s drive of the Bluegrass State do these nearby communities rely on faraway California and Arizona or even Mexico for fresh produce.?

Last Sunday, it was announced that a company called AppHarvest was getting $82 million in cash investment from Equilibrium Capital to begin construction on the first 60 acres or 2.7 square feet of greenhouses near Pikeville, Ky.

And as we loved to say when I was in the development business, “earth-moving equipment is already on the site.” I think I remember seeing something about this on “60 Minutes” some time ago. A bunch of super-rich people went around the country coming up with ideas for areas in economic hurt.

And for Eastern Kentucky, they see a new hub of regional produce.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

Categories: News in Food Safety

Chicken Nuggets and Chicken Tenders Recalled for Bones

US Food Safety - June 1, 2019 - 7:37am

Perdue Foods LLC.,  Bridgewater, Virginia, is recalling approximately 31,703 pounds of ready-to-eat chicken products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically pieces of bone material.

The fully cooked chicken products were produced on March 21, 2019. The following products are subject to recall: [View labels (PDF only)]

  • 11.2 oz. plastic trays containing “PERDUE Simply Smart ORGANICS BREADED CHICKEN BREAST TENDERS – GLUTEN FREE” with a “USE BY MAY 20 2019” and UPC bar code of 072745-001437 on the label.
  • 12 oz. plastic trays containing “PERDUE Simply Smart ORGANICS BREADED CHICKEN BREAST NUGGETS – WHOLE GRAIN” with a “USE BY MAY 20 2019” and UPC bar code of 072745-001642 on the label.
  • 12 oz. plastic trays containing “PERDUE Simply Smart ORGANICS BREADED CHICKEN BREAST STRIPS – WHOLE GRAIN” with a “USE BY MAY 20 2019” and UPC bar code of 072745-002656 on the label.
  • 10-lb. bulk boxes of “Chef Quik Breaded Chicken Tenders Boneless Tender Shaped Chicken Breast Patties with Rib Meat” with Case Code 22143 on the label.
  • 10-lb. bulk boxes of “Chef Quik Chicken Breast Strips Strip Shaped Breaded Chicken Breast Patties with Rib Meat” with Case Code 77265 on the label.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. P-369” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered after FSIS and the company received consumer complaints.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be consumers’ freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

Consumers should call the Perdue Consumer Care line at (866) 866-3703.

© 2019 US Food Safety Corporation. No copyright claim is made for portions of this blog and linked items that are works of the United States Government, state governments or third parties.

Categories: News in Food Safety

95,393 pounds of Ready-to-Eat Smoked Sausage Recalled for Plastic

US Food Safety - June 1, 2019 - 7:23am

Johnsonville, LLC.,  Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin, is recalling approximately 95,393 pounds of its ready-to-eat jalapeño cheddar smoked sausage products that may be contaminated with extraneous material, specifically hard green plastic.

The jalapeño cheddar smoked sausage items were produced and packaged on March 12 and 13, 2019. The following products are subject to recall: [View labels (PDF only)]

  • 14-oz. film, vacuum packages containing “Johnsonville JALAPEÑO CHEDDAR Smoked Sausage” with a “Best By 06/09/2019” date on the back of the package.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 34224” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped nationwide and internationally.

The problem was discovered when the company notified FSIS that they received a consumer complaint regarding green hard plastic in the product.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Kirsten Bishir, Johnsonville, LLC. Consumer Relations Coordinator, at KBishir@johnsonville.com and by phone or text at 1-888-556-2728.

Categories: News in Food Safety

Maine Fish Chowder Recipe from Bar Harbor Foods

US Food Safety - June 1, 2019 - 7:10am

Sponsored Recipe

Easy, Delicious Fish Chowder made especially flavorful by the inclusion of Bar Harbor Fish Stock, made from sustainable fish rack, fresh vegetables and white wine.

Serves: 4 to 6

Active time: 20 minutes

Total time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

1 lb boneless, skinless White Fish Fillets, such as Atlantic Haddock or Alaskan Pollock

2  15 oz cans Bar Harbor brand all natural Fish Stock

1  medium sweet Onion, finely chopped

4  small Potatoes, randomly chopped

Fresh Ground Cracked Pepper

Sea Salt

16 oz Half & Half

1/4 stick Butter

Preparation:

In 6-quart pot add random cut potatoes in ½ to ¾ inch pieces and finely chopped onion.

Add Fish Stock

Bring to a boil; lower heat.

Add Fish cut into large 3 to 4 inch pieces.

Add Cracked Pepper and Sea Salt to taste.

On low heat, with pot covered, poach fish on top of contents, until potatoes are just tender to a fork test.

Add Half & Half and Butter; simmer uncovered on low heat 10 minutes.

Serve immediately or for more flavorful chowder, cool, refrigerate over night and reheat and serve the following day.

Where to Buy Bar Harbor Fish Chowder.

© 2019 US Food Safety Corporation. No copyright claim is made for portions of this blog and linked items that are works of the United States Government, state governments or third parties.

Categories: News in Food Safety

EZGluten Testing Kit- the easy way to detect gluten in food

US Food Safety - June 1, 2019 - 7:01am

Sponsored Advertisement

INTRODUCING….     

       

                       EZ GlutenTM, manufactured by ELISA Technologies, is an easy to use home test that will quickly detect the presence of gluten in foods. It is sensitive enough to detect levels of gluten as low as 10 parts per million (ppm). For reference, current FDA standards require < 20 ppm for gluten free labeling.

This simple test is also small and portable for use at home and when traveling. It can be used to test individual ingredients in foods, or to test finished and cooked products and beverages.

How it works.

In the EZ GlutenTM testing kit, a food sample is ground to a fine consistency, added to the gluten extraction solution, and then mixed. A few drops of the sample extract are placed into a test tube.

The EZ GlutenTM test strip is placed into the test tube and allowed to absorb the sample extract. After 10 minutes, the test strip can be read for the presence of gluten in the sample.

The EZ GlutenTM testing kit is also a good solution for testing prepping and cooking surfaces. ELISA Technologies also offers sterile swabs available for purchase. Please call (352) 337-3929 for more information.

 

 

 

© 2019 US Food Safety Corporation. No copyright claim is made for portions of this blog and linked items that are works of the United States Government, state governments or third parties.

Categories: News in Food Safety

Consumer complaints prompt recall of 95,000 pounds of Johnsonville smoked sausage

Food Safety news - May 31, 2019 - 9:05pm

The iconic Johnsonville company has initiated an international recall of some of its smoked sausage after a consumer complained about finding hard, green plastic in some jalapeño cheddar smoked sausage.

More than 95,000 pounds of the smoked sausage, all produced and packaged on March 12, are subject to the recall. The 14-ounce packages have a best-by date of June 9 printed on the back. The sausage packages also have the establishment number “EST. 34224” printed inside the USDA mark of inspection on their labels.  

“FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers,” according to the recall notice posted by the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). 

“Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.”

Other than stating Johnsonville LLC had distributed the smoked sausage nationally and internationally, the recall notice did not include any information about where the company shipped the product.

The FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Kirsten Bishir, Johnsonville consumer relations coordinator, at KBishir@johnsonville.com and by phone or text at 888-556-2728.

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Categories: News in Food Safety

BVL informs about illness risk from raw milk

Food Safety news - May 31, 2019 - 9:03pm

A German agency informed the public about the risks of drinking raw milk ahead of World Milk Day on June 1.

The Federal Office of Consumer Protection and Food Safety (BVL) announcement covered the different forms of supply and associated bacterial contamination.

It advised vulnerable groups of people to refrain from having raw and certified raw milk (Vorzugsmilch) due to the potential microbial load. Since raw milk is not subjected to heat treatment like pasteurized drinking milk, disease-causing germs are not killed and can cause illness.

Consumers can buy milk in the supermarket but milk “filling stations” or dispensers, also referred to as vending machines, are increasingly popular in the country.

Unpasteurized, raw milk may contain zoonotic agents which originate from the animal or are introduced via the milking process. Salmonella, Campylobacter or Listeria can be transmitted from animals to humans and trigger disease.

The Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) recommends that sensitive groups of the population, such as children, pregnant women or the elderly and immunocompromised, should not consume unboiled raw milk.

The agency added there is a risk for healthy adults of infection when drinking raw milk that has not been boiled, which can lead to mild or severe illnesses, depending on the pathogen.

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) selected June 1 as World Milk Day from 2001.

Raw milk product testing
Food authorities in federal states ran tests on raw milk offered at filling stations on 2016. Samples were tested for pathogens as part of zoonosis monitoring and the federal surveillance plan coordinated by BVL.

Raw milk may only be delivered to consumers directly in the dairy farm where the following is visible: “raw milk, boil before consumption” (“milk from the farm”).

Up to 4 percent of raw milk samples intended for further processing as well as milk from farm dispensing machines were contaminated with Campylobacter spp., Listeria monocytogenes and Shiga toxin producing E. coli (STEC).

Results of the investigations on the “milk from the farm” for hygiene indicators such as E. coli and coagulase-positive staphylococci also showed that raw milk delivered directly to the consumer showed issues with hygiene.

A total of 18 outbreaks were reported to the BVL in 2017 caused by consumption of raw milk that was not boiled. A total of 221 people were infected with Campylobacter, while others fell ill with Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) and the tick borne encephalitis (TBE) virus.

BVL officials said results confirm that raw milk may pose a risk of infection and should always be heated before consumption.

Certified milk is packaged raw milk from certain previously approved and controlled dairy farms. The animals, farm and certified milk are subject to special hygiene measures. In samples of certified milk no pathogens were detected in the monitoring programs, so the high hygienic requirements mitigate contamination.

However, the BVL advises vulnerable consumers not to drink certified milk as it is intended for direct consumption and occurrence of pathogens cannot be completely ruled out.

A health hazard can also come from products such as raw milk cheese as results from zoonotic monitoring in 2014 and 2015 found.

Up to 1.6 percent of raw milk cheese samples were positive for Salmonella spp., STEC and Listeria monocytogenes.

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Categories: News in Food Safety

Perdue recalls chicken nuggets after consumer complaints about bone

Food Safety news - May 31, 2019 - 9:02pm

An unspecified number of complaints to Perdue Foods LLC and the federal government have led to the company recalling almost 16 tons of chicken nuggets, tenders and strips. Consumers reported finding pieces of bone in the products.

Purdue distributed the 31,703 pounds of ready-to-eat chicken products to retailers nationwide. Some of the products are distributed frozen, others are refrigerated. Some are in consumer-sized packages, others are in bulk boxes.

Simply Smart Organics branded consumer packages and Chef Quik brand bulk boxes are included in the recall, according to the recall posted by the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).

“FSIS is concerned that some product may be consumers’ freezers,” the recall says. “Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.”

Consumers, retailers and others can use the following labeling information to determine whether they have the recalled Perdue chicken products in their possession:

  • 11.2 oz. plastic trays containing “PERDUE Simply Smart ORGANICS BREADED CHICKEN BREAST TENDERS – GLUTEN FREE” with a “USE BY MAY 20 2019” and UPC bar code of 072745-001437 on the label.
  • 12 oz. plastic trays containing “PERDUE Simply Smart ORGANICS BREADED CHICKEN BREAST NUGGETS – WHOLE GRAIN” with a “USE BY MAY 20 2019” and UPC bar code of 072745-001642 on the label.
  • 12 oz. plastic trays containing “PERDUE Simply Smart ORGANICS BREADED CHICKEN BREAST STRIPS – WHOLE GRAIN” with a “USE BY MAY 20 2019” and UPC bar code of 072745-002656 on the label.
  • 10-lb. bulk boxes of “Chef Quik Breaded Chicken Tenders Boneless Tender Shaped Chicken Breast Patties with Rib Meat” with Case Code 22143 on the label.
  • 10-lb. bulk boxes of “Chef Quik Chicken Breast Strips Strip Shaped Breaded Chicken Breast Patties with Rib Meat” with Case Code 77265 on the label.

To see labels of all products subject to this recall, click here.

Purdue produced all of the products on March 21. The company did not provide expiration dates for the frozen bulk-pack products. All of the recalled products have the establishment number “EST. P-369” stamped inside the USDA mark of inspection on their labels.

Although consumer complaints prompted the recall, the FSIS reported that no adverse reactions or injuries had been confirmed as of the posting of the recall notice on Friday afternoon. 

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks. When available, retail distribution lists will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Consumers with questions should call the Perdue consumer care line at 866-866-3703.

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Categories: News in Food Safety

Washington importer recalls tamales that were not inspected at border

Food Safety news - May 31, 2019 - 9:01pm

During their routine daily duties, federal inspectors discovered 9,000 pounds of chicken and pork tamales being imported by a Moxee, WA, company had not been checked at the U.S. border.

As a result, Los Hernandez LLC is recalling the “hand made” tamales from its own restaurant in Union Gap, WA. Some of the tamales “may have been packaged and sold to consumers from December 2018 through May 1, 2019,” according to a recall notice posted by the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).

The tamales were in 30-pound boxes and labeled simply as “Los Hernandez Authentic Pork TAMALES Hand Made” and “Los Hernandez Authentic Chicken TAMALES Hand Made” according to the recall notice.

“There are no specific identifying labels for consumers who may have carried out the tamales from the restaurant,” the FSIS reported. “The tamale products were produced from Dec. 3, 2018, through Feb. 7, 2019.”

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider. Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Felipe Hernandez, president of Los Hernandez Tamales LLC, at 509-571-1394.

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Categories: News in Food Safety

Los Hernandez Tamales, LLC Recalls Chicken and Pork Products Produced Without Benefit of Inspection

Los Hernandez, LLC., a Moxee, Wash. establishment, is recalling approximately 9,090 pounds of chicken and pork tamales that were produced without the benefit of federal inspection.
Categories: News in Food Safety

Perdue Foods LLC Recalls Perdue Simply Smart Organics Poultry Products Due to Possible Foreign Matter Contamination

Perdue Foods LLC., a Bridgewater, Va. establishment, is recalling approximately 31,703 pounds of ready-to-eat chicken products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically pieces of bone material.
Categories: News in Food Safety

Johnsonville, LLC. Recalls Ready-To-Eat Jalapeño Cheddar Smoked Sausage Links Due to Possible Foreign Matter Contamination

Johnsonville, LLC., a Sheboygan Falls, Wis. establishment, is recalling approximately 95,393 pounds of its ready-to-eat jalapeño cheddar smoked sausage products that may be contaminated with extraneous material, specifically hard green plastic.
Categories: News in Food Safety

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